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YOU CAN'T TAKE THAT AWAY FROM ME (in Zhangbei, China)

YOU CAN'T TAKE THAT AWAY FROM ME (in Zhangbei, China)

       My practice deals with issues of identity, politics, cross-culturalism, and the surreal characteristics of my body in the ever - changing environment. My current body of work explores Chinese culture versus American culture, my female gender versus the patriarchy that is reflected in municipal sculptures in China, and Chinese Communist politics versus the “only one child” generations. My performances isolate my persona as a female in China within extreme natural landscapes such as the Yinchuan desert and the Qin Shi Huang mausoleum.

       I seek to be a cultural organizer who utilizes body based sculptural forms (mask/costume/object) and transforms discarded materials and disregarded spaces by using the tools of humor and absurdity. By placing traditional sculptural forms within new sites, materials, and social constructs, I investigate these forms,  movements within global communities to re-view and re-envision shared spaces and performative practices. I utilize my persona as a mark to allow others to recognize their own form of life: I become their medium. As the only child in my family, I want to describe the loneliness and pressure my generation encounters.

       The personal becomes political. To reflect the patriarchal society in China, I imitate historical monuments, such as statues of Chairman Mao, while taking multiple photos of myself jumping in the air. I want to make something absurd in order to question reality: which is more real, the sculpture of the patriarchic figure or the person jumping? My practice, which is founded in the brief interconnectedness of all things, explores universal questions at the intersection of the cosmos, life, death, reality, spirituality and technology.

YOU CAN'T TAKE THAT AWAY FROM ME (in Zhangbei, China)

       My practice deals with issues of identity, politics, cross-culturalism, and the surreal characteristics of my body in the ever - changing environment. My current body of work explores Chinese culture versus American culture, my female gender versus the patriarchy that is reflected in municipal sculptures in China, and Chinese Communist politics versus the “only one child” generations. My performances isolate my persona as a female in China within extreme natural landscapes such as the Yinchuan desert and the Qin Shi Huang mausoleum.

       I seek to be a cultural organizer who utilizes body based sculptural forms (mask/costume/object) and transforms discarded materials and disregarded spaces by using the tools of humor and absurdity. By placing traditional sculptural forms within new sites, materials, and social constructs, I investigate these forms,  movements within global communities to re-view and re-envision shared spaces and performative practices. I utilize my persona as a mark to allow others to recognize their own form of life: I become their medium. As the only child in my family, I want to describe the loneliness and pressure my generation encounters.

       The personal becomes political. To reflect the patriarchal society in China, I imitate historical monuments, such as statues of Chairman Mao, while taking multiple photos of myself jumping in the air. I want to make something absurd in order to question reality: which is more real, the sculpture of the patriarchic figure or the person jumping? My practice, which is founded in the brief interconnectedness of all things, explores universal questions at the intersection of the cosmos, life, death, reality, spirituality and technology.

YOU CAN'T TAKE THAT AWAY FROM ME (in Zhangbei, China)